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Subject: Re: Sizing a Postfix server
From: Brad Knowles (blkskynet.be)
Date: Tue Feb 15 2000 - 03:45:13 CST


At 5:57 PM -0600 2000/2/14, Doug Kratky wrote:

> - Need to send a few hundred thousand messages an hour - most under 2K
> bytes

        Do the math. Hundreds of thousands of messages per hour equals
thousands to tens of thousands of messages per minute, which equals
25-250 messages per second (conversely, it also equals 2.5 million to
25 million messages per day, if that rate is sustained).

        While you might theoretically be able to get close to 25 messages
per second on a private high-speed network and sending zero-length
messages around, I doubt you're going to get that on a real-world
mail server, with recipients all over the world, etc....

        Can you build postfix machines that can do millions of (small)
mail messages per day across the world? Yes. But it's a non-trivial
task.

> Is this something a Linux on Pentium box would be capable of doing? How
> about a low-end Solaris server?
> Does CPU (number of CPUs or CPU speed) tend to be the limiting factor?

        Number of CPUs and CPU speed will be one factor, but I believe
that they will be less important than the amount of RAM you have in
your machine, the speed of the NIC in the machine, the congestion of
your LAN, the speed and latency of your terrestrial WAN connections,
etc....

-- 
   These are my opinions and should not be taken as official Skynet policy
  _________________________________________________________________________
|o| Brad Knowles, <blkskynet.be>                 Belgacom Skynet NV/SA |o|
|o| Systems Architect, Mail/News/FTP/Proxy Admin  Rue Col. Bourg, 124   |o|
|o| Phone/Fax: +32-2-706.13.11/726.93.11          B-1140 Brussels       |o|
|o| http://www.skynet.be                          Belgium               |o|
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